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Be Our Guest

You can be among the first visitors to the new chancellor’s residence on Centennial Campus. Randy and Susan Woodson invite faculty and staff to a holiday reception from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday (Dec. 9).

To make it easy to attend, shuttles will run between Reynolds Coliseum and The Point throughout the event, with a stop at the College of Textiles. If you drive, parking will be available at the nearby Park Alumni Center. Please consider carpooling if possible.

The residence features hardwoods and energy-saving lighting.

Open House

While you nosh, you can enjoy views of Lake Raleigh and appreciate the finer points of NC State’s latest architectural addition, The Point.

Designed by Marvin Malecha, dean of the College of Design, the chancellor’s residence was funded with private donations from more than 70 individuals and businesses. The $3 million residence includes 5,400 square feet for public events on the lower level and 3,100 square feet of living quarters upstairs.

“We asked, ‘Who owns this house?’” Malecha said. “Though the chancellor lives there, the house truly belongs to the NC State family.” For insight about what goes into designing a place that’s both public and private, read Malecha’s Q&A in DesignLife, which features more photos of the residence.

Featured Attractions

Be sure to look up as you walk in for the reception. The entryway ceiling is made from a cypress tree grown in the university’s Hofmann Forest. You’ll also find poplar trim and locally sourced hardwood floors, along with other wood finishings.

The Point, completed in 18 months, was built with private donations.

Less apparent are the residence’s many environmentally conscious features. It’s built with sustainable materials and uses geothermal heating and cooling. The eye-catching fixtures use long-lasting LED lights.

The Point, which replaces the previous residence, built in 1928, is also designed to last. Malecha has envisioned a 200th anniversary celebration at The Point, 75 years from now.

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